The Master Tailor - Environment Assets

So, The Master Tailor, the project that consumed most of my art life, needs assets. Yes, assets. Not illustrations, concept art, or models, sketches...whatever. In order to do those, I need some parts to make up the backbone for expediency and continuity.

Oh hey it's 5AM and I need to get in 3.5 hours of Tailor work before work work. It gets me through the day, most of the time when I get caught with glazed-over eyes.  Assets for dayz.

Screenshot 2018-09-01 19.38.35.png

Because of an extensive break from illustration and art responsibilities, I've had a lot of time to recharge for the Master Tailor project. The first laborious task is the creation of the art assets I will need for many illustrations. A lot of time is spent creating brushes, patterns, nozzles - all kinds of things that will speed up my work flow. It can be mind-numbing, but also therapeutic spending so much time on tiny little art pieces in and of themselves to make something much larger.

Because the setting is in New Orleans, tons of local planlife will be needed for what I hope will be a large variety of environments. With swamps, forests, fields, and the city itself, the overgrowth will need tons of variability between hand painting.

 Yucca buds.  I suppose I could go the Photoshop route with their brushes, but while I find it great in its rudimentality, it leaves far too much work remaining after the initial laying down of textures and colors for the way I work. PS is useful for the background and tertiary details of my work for sure, but for the focal elements, Photoshop's ability in this case pales in comparison to Painter's nozzle and brush abilities. I think it is one of the reasons why so so many artists shy away from the program. It takes a ton of work and learning up front to get to where the program becomes useful on an individuals's tastes, and I don't blame anyone for not having time for that.  Especially  in a production environment.

Yucca buds.  I suppose I could go the Photoshop route with their brushes, but while I find it great in its rudimentality, it leaves far too much work remaining after the initial laying down of textures and colors for the way I work. PS is useful for the background and tertiary details of my work for sure, but for the focal elements, Photoshop's ability in this case pales in comparison to Painter's nozzle and brush abilities. I think it is one of the reasons why so so many artists shy away from the program. It takes a ton of work and learning up front to get to where the program becomes useful on an individuals's tastes, and I don't blame anyone for not having time for that. Especially in a production environment.

 More more more. I will not post how many of these I actually did. It's a lot. 2 days worth. 

More more more. I will not post how many of these I actually did. It's a lot. 2 days worth.